Current Events Spotlight Issues
(there are too many issues that need attention to address everything here. I will try to Spotlight causes and update them consistently. Please contact me if there is a cause or story you want in the spotlight.)
I willl only include topics I have researched. I will add more as I learn or remember more. But for now I will only speak on the things I have looked into.
Current Events Spotlight Topic:
Mental Heath in Black and Black LGBT Community
With the vast world that social media brings to our fingertips we are constantly and consistently exposed to traumatizing and often graphic content. This content is naturally amplified when something goes viral. In addition to this circulating traumatizing content, over stories begin to get brought up. This is very important in the concept of transparency of the events of the worlds and making sure important events are not hidden from the public, but this also means that peoples social media feeds and daily conversations are filled with traumatizing information and content.
2020 has been an especially significant year for many reasons. Many emotions are being addressed and not for the first time. With people struggling through being stuck at home from most peoples first experience with a pandemic, the economy is failing, families are struggling and people are already angry and in pain with the responses of those who are support to lead us.
The top blew off when Former Officer Derek CXXX with compliance from former officers XXXX publicly murdered George Floyd and were not held accountable. This was such a blatant example of the deep poison on racism imbedded in our country that it blew the top offf an already boiling kettle. While awareness is being raised on the systemic injustice when it comes to the disproportionate murder of black people and people of color as well as just injustices and micro aggressions that have effected their lives for years. For the first time it seems to be getting through to people deeper. Maybe because we have been cooped up in the house but it can't be ignored anymore. As awarenesses is raised by people finding the bravery to share their stories, we approach the challenge of how to show the good the bad and the VERY ugly while also keeping mental health in tact. I do not have the answer to this. But I think the mental health of our communities is extremely important if we are all going to change each corrupted system from the inside out. We all need to take care of our mental health as much as our physical to fight for change.
I believe we need to normalize therapy and assistance when it comes to mental health. We need to normalize seeking help for all ages, races, sexual orientations, religions and backgrounds. 
Due to recent events, for this spotlight I want to focus on services that help fund and organize therapy and mental health services for black women, black men, black children (cis, trans & lgbq+)
​The trauma of opening this app & learning about the death of another black person EVERYDAY. - Aaron req
SOME ORGANIZATIONS THAT NEED YOUR HELP
Help fund free therapy sessions
for black women and girls:
"We are aiming to raise $600,000 in order to offer over 5,000 hours of FREE therapy sessions for black women and girls to go to therapy.  With therapy sessions in the U.S. typically costing anywhere from $60 - $250-- even with insurance, the prevalent and ingrained stigma surrounding mental health in many communities, and the fact that the vast majority of therapists in this country are white, it is often difficult for Black women and girls to access therapy when they need it. We wanted to change that. "
Help fund free therapy sessions
for black women and girls:
"This fund is designed to provide financial assistance for black journalists facing financial hardship who are unable to pay for the mental health support they need during this time. While publications ask black journalists — both freelance and full-time staff members — to put their lives at risk to report on racial injustices and embed themselves within the protests, they rarely provide resources for these same journalists to process the trauma incurred both on the job and in daily life. "
Help fund free therapy sessions for black women and girls:
"This fund will allow Black women and men to process psychological issues and heal their trauma in safe spaces. Funds will be used specifically for individual, family, and group therapy services for Black communities. Your support will provide mental health access to individuals who typically wait months for free services, due to constant state budget cuts."
Help fund free therapy sessions for black women and girls:
"Viable mental health resources can be hard to access, especially for marginalized communities, and with current events these resources can become even more inaccessible. We are currently trying to raise money for Mental Realness Mag, a mental health publication dedicated to showcasing work from black femmes and prioritizing conversations surrounding our mental health. We need funds for website maintenance, publishing costs (as we’re looking to begin print issues), and to begin paying our contributors (all of whom are black and all of whom are queer, trans, non-binary, and/or womxn). We offer free online issues of our magazine so as to remain accessible to the community we’re serving. We’re hoping to offset the costs of doing this via donations so we don’t have to charge our supporters who may not be able to access a mental health resource/community otherwise."
Help fund free therapy sessions for black women and girls:
"This #GaFamilyTherapyFund seeks to help 100 Black families (including children, teens, adults and couples ) receive 4-6 counseling sessions during this critical time of intense racial trauma, for free. We will gather at least 40 culturally responsive therapists that can see 2 -3 clients. "
Help fund free therapy sessions for black women and girls:
"Home Girls is run by Hanna and Yasin, two eldest daughters, who found themselves struggling with the daily responsibilities of being in an immigrant household and saw a gap that needed to be filled to provide support for fellow immigrant daughters.
Since 2018, we have facilitated monthly sessions for the women and created online resources including our weekly podcast.  Our group sessions always aim to tackle issues that women from immigrant homes face on a daily basis. We want to do more, being able to scale and gain financial support will allow for us to be able to support more women.  Some of our session have been based around subjects such as tough love, mindfulness, self-care and financial fraud literacy and more. "
FOR THIS SPOTLIGHT & FOR PRIDE MONTH WE WILL BE SPOTLIGHTING FINN'S GOFUND ME
"Hi! I’m Findlay Hardge, better known as simply Finn! I’m a bisexual black trans man; as well as a student director/actor, activist and writer. With the events of the year - from Covid 19 eliminating job opportunities to witnessing the rampant injustices the black community continues to face everyday - the need for therapy has grown stronger than ever. I suffer from depression and an anxiety disorder already, which has been worsened by the imposing threat of instability. My symptoms have been amplified for months, to the point of being unbearable. It is nearly impossible for me to relax. Therapy for the rest of the year would secure much needed healing. The money raised in this fundraiser would cover my health care bills, transportation, therapy sessions and my Testosterone prescription for the rest of the year. Meeting my goal would finally give me a sense of peace of mind in these times. Thank you so much! Much love & happy Pride!!"
Help fund free therapy sessions for black women and girls.
Help fund free therapy sessions for black women and girls.
​"praying for all the black women who need a hug but don’t have time to pause the fight. the ones who don’t have arms to collapse into when they need to mourn & be held. the ones who keep doing what’s right even when the world won’t protect us. the ones who are tired but won’t quit"
Skye Townsend
Help fund free therapy sessions for black women and girls.
Help fund free therapy sessions for black women and girls.
Help fund free therapy sessions for black women and girls.
Help fund free therapy sessions for black women and girls.
Help fund free therapy sessions for black women and girls.
Help fund free therapy sessions for black women and girls.
Help fund free therapy sessions for black women and girls.
Help fund free therapy sessions for black women and girls.
Help fund free therapy sessions for black women and girls.
Help fund free therapy sessions for black women and girls.
Some Extra Helpful Information
https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/four-in-five-lgbt-people-admit-their-mental-health-has-been-worse-during-lockdown/
https://twitter.com/JDavid_VS/status/1271146749378396161?s=20
The Black Mental Health Organization: As an organization who first represents the African American/Black community, we care about your well being & want to ensure that you protect your mental health. Here’s a thread of resources, tips, & important information we believe may help:
https://twitter.com/BMHO19/status/1266049746927529989?s=20
https://www.teachmentalhealth.org
https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2020/06/12/mental-health-george-floyd-census/?arc404=true
Help fund free therapy sessions for black women and girls.
If you have resources or causes you want me to feature: email contactalixfullerton@gmail.com
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artwork by @louiseanog
A personal Note:
Part of being an artist is having a voice that people take time to listen to. No matter how small I must use it and so must you. ​
If there is something you can do to help someone, there is no excuse not to.
This world has moved consistently in the direction of progress over time. With new knowledge we evolve as human being. Just as we have evolved past the days of gladiators and public executions for entertainment, we must evolve past the still prevalent injustices that this world take part in, even if these new injustices have a new face.
As a white woman my perspective is limited and I am not someone to teach on the oppression of others that I have not and will never experience personally. 
So I will use whatever platform I have to share the words of others and let them lead.
Here we celebrate diversity of color, culture and heritage. We are not color blind. 
For my young listeners: changing this world to be a place of fairness, justice and true equlity starts with you. You have been given the gift of perspecitive with social media. You can hear and share stories across the world. It is your responsibility to learn, and teach as well as be involved by how the world is run.
For my older listeners: listen. teach what you know from your experience but listen to the young, their voices matter, they are the ones 
I have put together a list (and will be adding more to it) of causes as well as educational resources that have added much perspective to my life. Please take time to check out at least one of the resources I have included. If for some reason these topics make you angry or uncomfortable I advise you to strongly look anyway. What is wrong with hearing other perspective, I'm not saying you have to agree with me or those who have shared their stories, but you have to at least listen.
We must be more involved with our communities and our collective decision making. We are unhappy but most of us aren't involved enough. I am no angel, I have not been involved in current affairs as I should have been, there are endless issues in this world and it is exhausting trying to keep up and feeling helpless to make change. but change is slow, change is not one big ac but many small acts over time working together that creates change. It was wrong to not use my energy for enough progressive change so I am changing that. 
I have decided it is important to me to do what I can from here on out to be a better, kinder and more understanding person. 
I will make an effort to learn about other perspectives, cultures and events and if I can , do what I can do effect change. You should to. Life is bigger than your own experiences. It took me too long to figure this out. So start now and be open. We can all create change in the world.
We do not all have to agree politically, but we must all be open to educations, to learning new things and to hearing other perspectives and truly holding ourselves accountable for how we many have been wrong or hurt others in the past.
If you are interested in sharing your story on my website or platform please message me.
Steps to being an effective ally:
listen
learn
take time to educate ourselves on non-eurocentralized history and stories told by non-white peoples
take responsibility and reflect, this is not an attack, this is a conversation
we must leave our egos at the door
be the best person you can be
think of other perspectives in your memories and your day to day lives
Black Lives Matter
LGBTQ
Covid + covid stories
Environment / Water
Spotlight Issues
Individual Stories
Yemen
Youth
Women
System / Industries
Disabilities

Black History

Podcasts 

"XXXX" 

- TOPIC: 

SUMARY SUMMARY

Listen Here: XXXLINKXX

"African Hair Before Bondage: Queen Nzingha lecture 61"

"Our special guest Queen Nzingha lecturer, Professor Lori Tharps from Temple University Philadelphia, gives a unique, illustrated talk taken from her book 'Hair Story: Untangling the roots of Black Hair.'"

- White people do not grow up understanding that black hair is more than just hair. It is a perspective we do not understand, we must listen to those who do. There is a history and a stolen pride. 

Watch Here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhxIAkOOFEc

Small Businesses:

know where your money is going and support who its going to

"I feel so privileged to be able to look at a list of companies that use prison labor (ex. Walmart, Starbucks, Whole Foods) & simply say, “Okay, I won’t shop there anymore.” There is so much privilege in being able to exercise your economic voice & I wish we talked about that more" - @miyairl (Twitter)

Black Owned

Small Businesses

TOYS

"Roots Dolls" 

Toy company that creates dolls with curlpower to teach girls to love their curls The only doll with hair you can wash and style.

Check them out Here: https://healthyrootsdolls.com

IG: https://www.instagram.com/healthyrootsdolls/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/RootsDolls

Kids
@ozzieolive
@braveandkindbooks
@avaandisa
@cocopieclothing
@prettypleaseteethers
@blackbabybooks
@harperimandolls
@booksofmelanin
@puzzlehuddle
@tippy_tot_shoes
@shop.opalandfig
@darlyngandco
Toyslikeme.com

COSMETICS
@kncbeauty
@mdmflow
@mentedcosmetics
@thelipbar
@beautybakeriemakeup
@juviasplace
@mischobeauty

Videos to Watch

"XXXX" 

- TOPIC: 

SUMARY SUMMARY

Listen Here: XXXLINKXX

"African Hair Before Bondage: Queen Nzingha lecture 61"

"Our special guest Queen Nzingha lecturer, Professor Lori Tharps from Temple University Philadelphia, gives a unique, illustrated talk taken from her book 'Hair Story: Untangling the roots of Black Hair.'"

- White people do not grow up understanding that black hair is more than just hair. It is a perspective we do not understand, we must listen to those who do. There is a history and a stolen pride. 

Watch Here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhxIAkOOFEc

Jewellery
@_melaniemarie_
@dorcascreates
@peaceimagesjewelry
@jamandrico
@thirdcrown

Skincare

@oyinhandmade

@solonoir

@ehoneyskin

@gethyperskin

@ouithepeople

@himistry

@mybutterbarskin

@blackgirlsunscreen

@blkandgrn

Fashion/accessories

Badgalkierrah
@ceeceesclosetnyc
@dorcascreates
@brothervellies
@hanifa
@weardiop
@sherah_online
@thefolklore
@nubianskin
@thewraplife
@nudebarre
@onabags
@blkmktvintage

Homewares/lifestyle

@helloyowie

@bespokebinny

@toolsforlivingba

@rayoandhoney

@boleroadtextiles

@purhomeclean

@effiespaper

Latin X

Small Businesses

TOYS

"Roots Dolls" 

Toy company that creates dolls with curlpower to teach girls to love their curls The only doll with hair you can wash and style.

Check them out Here: https://healthyrootsdolls.com

IG: https://www.instagram.com/healthyrootsdolls/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/RootsDolls

Restaurants
Manny's Tortas
 

COSMETICS

Reina Rebelde Sigma Beauty (Brazilian owned) Besame Cosmetics Vive Cosmetics Melt Cosmetics Alamar Cosmetics

Cryptic Cosmetics :)

Vive Cosmetics

Jewellery
@_melaniemarie_
@dorcascreates
@peaceimagesjewelry
@jamandrico
@thirdcrown

Skincare

@oyinhandmade

@solonoir

@ehoneyskin

@gethyperskin

@ouithepeople

@himistry

@mybutterbarskin

@blackgirlsunscreen

@blkandgrn

Fashion/accessories

Badgalkierrah
@ceeceesclosetnyc
@dorcascreates
@brothervellies
@hanifa
@weardiop
@sherah_online
@thefolklore
@nubianskin
@thewraplife
@nudebarre
@onabags
@blkmktvintage

Homewares/lifestyle

@helloyowie

@bespokebinny

@toolsforlivingba

@rayoandhoney

@boleroadtextiles

@purhomeclean

@effiespaper

Indigenous

Small Businesses

Books

Movies

TV Shows

"HAIR STORY: Untangling the Roots of Black Hair in America" 

by Ayana D. Byrd and Lori L. Tharps

"Two world wars, the Civil Rights movement, and a Jheri curl later, Blacks in America continue to have a complex and convoluted relationship with their hair. From the antebellum practice of shaving the head in an attempt to pass as a "free" person to the 1998 uproar over a White third-grade teacher's reading of the book Nappy Hair, the issues surrounding African American hair continue to linger as we enter the twenty-first century.
Hair Story is a historical and anecdotal exploration of Black Americans' tangled hair roots. A chronological look at the culture and politics behind the ever-changing state of Black hair from fifteenth-century Africa to the present-day United States, it ties the personal to the political and the popular."

Buy Here: https://us.macmillan.com/books/9781250046574

"They Were Her Property: White Women As Slave Owners in the American South"

by Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers

A bold and searing investigation into the role of white women in the American slave economy. Bridging women's history, the history of the South, and African American history, this book makes a bold argument about the role of white women in American slavery. Historian Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers draws on a variety of sources to show that slave-owning women were sophisticated economic actors who directly engaged in and benefited from the South's slave market. Because women typically inherited more slaves than land, enslaved people were often their primary source of wealth. Not only did white women often refuse to cede ownership of their slaves to their husbands, they employed management techniques that were as effective and brutal as those used by slave-owning men. White women actively participated in the slave market, profited from it, and used it for economic and social empowerment. By examining the economically entangled lives of enslaved people and slave-owning women, Jones-Rogers presents a narrative that forces us to rethink the economics and social conventions of slaveholding America.

 

Download book as PDF: Click "GET" for download

https://libgen.lc/ads.php?md5=9CB5EDA8C4DD2F52980F2F83E502BF3F

Watch YouTube Video:

https://youtu.be/cmAxcRtv8qo

"Hate Thy Neighbor

by 

"Two world wars, the Civil Rights movement, and a Jheri curl later, Blacks in America continue to have a complex and convoluted relationship with their hair. From the antebellum practice of shaving the head in an attempt to pass as a "free" person to the 1998 uproar over a White third-grade teacher's reading of the book Nappy Hair, the issues surrounding African American hair continue to linger as we enter the twenty-first century.
Hair Story is a historical and anecdotal exploration of Black Americans' tangled hair roots. A chronological look at the culture and politics behind the ever-changing state of Black hair from fifteenth-century Africa to the present-day United States, it ties the personal to the political and the popular."

Buy Here: https://us.macmillan.com/books/9781250046574

"They Were Her Property: White Women As Slave Owners in the American South"

by Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers

A bold and searing investigation into the role of white women in the American slave economy. Bridging women's history, the history of the South, and African American history, this book makes a bold argument about the role of white women in American slavery. Historian Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers draws on a variety of sources to show that slave-owning women were sophisticated economic actors who directly engaged in and benefited from the South's slave market. Because women typically inherited more slaves than land, enslaved people were often their primary source of wealth. Not only did white women often refuse to cede ownership of their slaves to their husbands, they employed management techniques that were as effective and brutal as those used by slave-owning men. White women actively participated in the slave market, profited from it, and used it for economic and social empowerment. By examining the economically entangled lives of enslaved people and slave-owning women, Jones-Rogers presents a narrative that forces us to rethink the economics and social conventions of slaveholding America.

 

Download book as PDF: Click "GET" for download

https://libgen.lc/ads.php?md5=9CB5EDA8C4DD2F52980F2F83E502BF3F

Watch YouTube Video:

https://youtu.be/cmAxcRtv8qo